Privilege

Privilege

(noun | privileged, adjective)

Privilege is an acknowledgement of the fact that societies treat people differently based on a variety of factors— size, shape, ethnicity, hairstyle, clothing, gender, attraction orientation, religion, education, physical and mental ability, and more. When someone “has privilege”, it means that there’s at least one way in which society treats that person better than another person based on a specific factor. But just because a person is privileged in one way doesn’t mean they’re privileged in all ways.

There’s no way to precisely quantify privilege and trying to do so is often referred to as “oppression olympics” because the entire concept of privilege isn’t about tallying pros and cons, but rather acknowledging that the system is negatively biased and working to remove those biases from our societies. That’s why it’s better to not try and “rank” different people with different types of privilege and instead work to acknowledge and break down the biases that contribute to those privileges.

e.g. Greyson, the Founder of the TLP,  is privileged in some ways because they are white. They do not face the same obstacles that Black people encounter. Greyson is not privileged in other ways because they are non-binary, a category of gender that is routinely erased

Further reading to gain expanded context:

Privilege 101: A Quick and Dirty Guide | Everyday Feminism

What Is White Privilege, Really? | Learning for Justice

Why It’s Important to Think About Privilege | Global Citizen

Different Types of Privilege Explained | Well + Good

What Trans Women Have Is More Complicated Than ‘Male Privilege’ | The Establishment


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